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Council Minutes    

Date: Tuesday 05 March 2019       Time: 06:00 PM       Location: Council Chamber       Contact: mpemberton@Mansfield.gov.uk

Attendance Details

PresentNames
Present:Executive Mayor Kate Allsop, Councillor Barry Answer, Councillor Katrina Atherton, Councillor Mick Barton, Councillor Kevin Brown, Councillor Andrew Burgin, Councillor Terry Clay, Councillor John Coxhead, Councillor Bill Drewett, Councillor Amanda Fisher, Councillor Stephen N. Garner, Councillor Stephen Harvey, Councillor Sally Higgins, Councillor Vaughan Hopewell, Councillor Brian Lohan, Councillor Sean McCallum, Councillor Ann Norman, Councillor Stuart Richardson, Councillor Stewart Rickersey, Councillor Dave Saunders, Councillor Ian Sheppard, Councillor Andy Sissons, Councillor John Smart, Councillor David M Smith, Councillor Roger Sutcliffe, Councillor Andrew Tristram, Councillor Sidney Walker, Councillor Stuart Wallace, Councillor Sonya Ward, Councillor Andy Wetton, Councillor Lesley Wright, Councillor Martin Wright
In AttendanceAttendees
In Attendance:Members of Public, Mariam Amos, Sarah Troman, Martyn Saxton , Eve Allsop , Julie Snowdon (part), David Evans , Mark Pemberton , Hayley Barsby , Jacqueline Collins , Emma Johnson , Caroline Kirk , Kerry Vardy (part)
ItemDescriptionBackground InformationDecision
 MAYORAL COMMENDATIONSMAYORAL COMMENDATIONS

The Executive Mayor presented Mayoral Commendations to -

Corey Spencer - Ice Skating Champion and
Graham Key - Grays Electrical Engineering Ltd

 
19/20APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCEAPOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE

Apologies were received for Councillor Adey, Councillor Bennett , Councillor Kerr and Councillor Bosnjak
 
19/21DECLARATIONS OF INTERESTDECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

The Executive Mayor and the Chief Executive Officer declared an interest in agenda item 9 - Mansfield Homes Ltd update.

All members declared a non - disclosable pecuniary interest in agenda item 12 - Council Tax Resolution, however, a dispensation was granted enabling Members to participate in the debate and vote on agenda item 12.
That the declarations of interest be noted
19/22MINUTESMINUTES

The minutes of the meeting held on 23 January 2019 were circulated to the Chamber for confirmation of accuracy.

Minutes
RESOLVED - That the minutes of the meeting held on 23 January 2019 be confirmed as a correct record.
19/23RECEIPT OF CORRESPONDENCE LAID BEFORE THE COUNCIL BY THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COUNCIL, EXECUTIVE MAYOR, MEMBERS OF THE EXECUTIVE OR CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICERRECEIPT OF CORRESPONDENCE LAID BEFORE THE COUNCIL BY THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COUNCIL, EXECUTIVE MAYOR, MEMBERS OF THE EXECUTIVE OR CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

No correspondence was reported to Council.
 
19/24ADVANCE QUESTIONS FROM MEMBERS OF THE PUBLICADVANCE QUESTIONS FROM MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC

Question from R. Elliman to the Executive Mayor

Can the Mayor confirm if she thinks 2 hours free parking will increase footfall within Mansfield Town centre?

Response from the Executive Mayor

Car parking is something we have considered very carefully, it has been proven that by offering a mixture of free parking charges encourages people into town.

Having the Four Seasons which we partly own, with over 57 shops Debenhams Primark WH Smith and Boots to name but a few is a huge draw into the town centre, however we know that the high street is changing and that change is something we have spent a lot of time analysing. We can’t just stick our finger in the air and guess a scheme may work.

We are working hard to increase footfall and our PR and Marketing department provide a wide range of events in the town, for example the big switch on at Christmas which attracted 10,000 people during the day and the ice skating rink bought 8000 additional visitors into the town centre over a month long period. The Christmas cabins helped to create a festive feel to the town. This was at a time when nationally footfall was dropping like a stone.

If every household spent just £5 in the town centre instead of online the independent shops cafes restaurants would have almost £1million extra each month or almost £12 million a year. I see it as our job to encourage residents and visitors into the town but we are fighting a battle as town centres across the country are dwindling.

We offer free parking for 30 minutes on our surface car parks. In the multi storey car parks we offer buy 2 hours get the 3rd free, so for just £2 you can park for three hours and the Four Seasons boasts free all day parking on Sunday. Looking at other authorities in similar size towns our car parking is very reasonable. We work hard to attract people from all over the east midlands and beyond as they can park for long periods of time cheaply.

We support our smaller centres in Forest Town, Woodhouse and Warsop with free parking because it helps them, we offer free after three at Water Meadows.

Every year we look a car parking and we are always looking for new initiatives and never rule anything out but everything we consider has to be researched and tested and with the massive Conservative cuts to our grant the Council’s priority lies with delivering services and working on the prevention agenda to keep people in their own homes for longer, especially our most vulnerable.

Supplementary question from Mr Elliman

Do you think the town centre shops, businesses, and shoppers would agree that we need two hours free parking in the town centre?

Response from the Executive Mayor

The shoppers that I speak to are delighted with the 30 minutes free in the surface car parks. They think that the buy two hours and get the third hour free in the multi-stories is a real bargain. What we’re trying to do is attract people for shorter journeys – so if you’re just nipping in to town it’s not going to cost you anything – but we want people to come in, we’re trying to create a destination and we want people to come in and spend dwell time in the town and that three hours for £2 is very attractive. Of all the comments I’ve had from residents, they’ve all thought that the free car parking that we offer, including the free all day on Sunday, is exceptional.

Question from L. Anderson to the Executive Mayor

Do you think putting some council services such as a cash office, housing and homelessness officers, front desk customer enquiries in to our Town Hall on Mansfield Market Place would make council services more accessible and increase footfall in our town centre?

Response from the Executive Mayor

We are delighted to bring the Old Town Hall back into full use for the first time in 30 years, we intend to utilise it to the full, with a mixture of Council services and by renting out both retail and office space.

Supplementary question from Mr Anderson

Do you think the residents of Mansfield would agree with you on that?

Response from the Executive Mayor

I’m quite sure they would.

Question from L. Anderson to the Executive Mayor

Mansfield is the only authority in the County that has an Executive Mayor instead of a council leader. In the other Nottinghamshire Local Authorities the average allowance for the council leaders is just over £19,000 p.a. How does the current Mayor justify the £60,000 a year she currently receives?

Response from the Executive Mayor

I’m afraid you have your figures completely wrong and I am actually the third lowest paid Executive Mayor in the country, the process to set the allowances are recommended by an independent panel.

This process is done for transparency so that the public can be assured that government leaders are paid fairly for the role they do. Indeed the Panel in its report state:-

“The different system of governance should be borne in mind when comparing Mansfield Members’ allowances to those of other local authorities.”

Therefore it is not a straightforward matter of comparing the Mayor’s allowance with that of the leaders of other authorities, as is acknowledged by the Independent Remuneration Panel.

I should point out that it was the district as a whole that supported, in a referendum, the move to a Mayor and Cabinet form of governance, and not a Leader and Cabinet where residents have no say in who leads the Council.

The role of leader in an authority is completely different to that of a Mayor, a leader is nominated to that role by their own party so just a handful of councillors decide who shall be their leader, where as a Directly Elected Mayor is elected to the role by the residents of the district. A Directly Elected Mayor is also the first citizen. The roles and responsibilities are completely different.

Supplementary question from Mr Anderson


The Conservative Mayoral candidate and council candidate for May’s election have pledged to bring the Mayor’s allowance down to around £17,000 in line with other council’s across the district. And the councillors to have the same level as Broxtowe councillors get paid doing the same job. This will save this authority £1m in four years. Will the current mayor commit to this policy and use the money towards bringing leisure services back to Warsop and regenerating our town centre?

Response from the Executive Mayor

I disagree with your figures and I’m sure that the electorate will decide whether they want a Mayor, a local Mayor who lives in District and who wants the very best for Mansfield and has a proven track record and that’s all I have to say on it.

Questions
 
19/25ADVANCE QUESTIONS FROM ELECTED MEMBERSADVANCE QUESTIONS FROM ELECTED MEMBERS

Question from Councillor Brown to Councillor Drewett

How many neighbourhood wardens do we have, and what is the cost of running the service?

Response from Councillor Drewett

On the establishment there are 12 neighbourhood wardens and two team leaders. However, there is currently a vacant warden post, which we will seek to recruit to very soon.

The overall budget costs associated with the Community Safety service totals £1,304,987 and includes the following:

• ASB Team (3fte - 4 staff) - £159,502
• Community Safety Partnership Manager - £15,000
• Neighbourhood Wardens (12 Wardens and 2 Team Leaders) - £636,699
• CCTV (7 fte and one Manager) - £457,000
• On Costs (legal services etc.) - £36,786

Total cost of service (including Community Safety Manager) : £1,304,987

Total cost excluding CCTV: £848,000

There was no supplementary question

Question from Councillor Brown to Councillor Tristram

Has the Street cleaning been reduced in any way?

Response from Councillor Tristram

On 12th April 2017 I took a delegated decision to agree the reduction in the budgetary provision in respect of Street Cleansing following a Change for the Future efficiency review linked to our budget challenges. The resolution was:

To be Resolved by Portfolio Holder for the Environment:

That option 1 of the report is approved; to realise a saving of £56,472 pa and agree to the reduction of one mechanical sweeper.

The reasons for the decision were:

Following the Change for the Future review of Street Cleansing services to achieve savings as part of the Council’s Medium Term Financial Strategy, three savings options were considered. The proposed option 1 will result in the least impact on service standards along with the lowest level of savings at £56,472 pa.

The loss of one sweeper was agreed as being the lowest level of budgetary impact to mitigate the impact on cleansing levels throughout the District. As I have previously confirmed, the levels of rubbish and detritus have not increased following this decision. At the time this decision was taken cleanliness levels for both detritus and litter were at 92%. The current levels as of quarter 3 2018/19 are 92.5% litter and 90% for detritus.

There was no supplementary question

3. Question from Councillor Walker to Executive Mayor

What was the outcome of the recent meeting you had with our MP on the 15th February?

Response from the Executive Mayor

I have instigated several meetings with our MP the last one being 15th February together with Councillor Drewett a police representative and four senior officers of the council. The meeting lasted an hour, so I can’t cover everything we discussed however we asked him for his assistance at Westminster and we explained the pressures we face as a district council.

1. I followed up from my previous request for Government to remove Business rates on Car Parks to allow additional free parking to the of free parking we already offer.

2. I asked him to Lobby for Fair Funding, it is wrong that Surrey gets more than a deprived area like Mansfield, we need him to lobby for the consideration of deprivation to be considered in the fair funding review.

3. I updated him on the meeting we had with stake holders on 5th February looking at the Future High Street Fund and asked for his support for our bid.

4. I also asked if he is aware that MDC fund 12 Neighbourhood Wardens the same number of police in the district

5. Asked for his support following the very successful Conference which Mansfield District Council organised with Nottingham Trent University to make Mansfield a University town.

6. I explained to him the pressure of losing 65% of our grant funding and by 19/20 that will become 95% lost funding, as government wants councils to be self sufficient

7. Homelessness, whilst we are dealing well with our Rough Sleeping community other districts are sending their homeless a Midland in Mansfield and therefore flooding the town centre with vulnerable people.

8. We asked for his support Mansfield the Town Centre and seek a call-in of the J28 retail development and to support our objection to this enormous retail planning permission as it will have a detrimental effect on the town centre.

9. Asked for his support to get funding to resolve the congestion on the A60

As you will appreciate a lot of discussion took place, I made a commitment when I was elected to work with the previous MP and have continued that dialogue with the current MP.

There was no supplementary question

Question from Councillor Bennett to Councillor Answer

How much has MDC spent on Council house repairs since 2015?

Response from Councillor Answer

The Council has spent the following on both capital investment in its stock as well as the delivery of responsive repairs, voids repairs, servicing and planned maintenance repairs (including employee costs, materials and support services):

2014/2015 £6,129,619
2015/2016 £6,680,387
2016/2017 £6,743,522
2017/2018 £7,309,337

There was no supplementary question

Question from Councillor Bennett to Councillor Answer

How much did MDC loose when the Government instructed rent reductions?

Response from Councillor Answer

The Council was required to reduce rents by 1% in each year for four years from April 2016. This will result in a loss of rental income totalling approximately £1 million (£250,000 per annum) over this 4 year period from 2016/17 to 2019/20.

If rents had continued to increase by CPI + 1% each year, as they had previous to the rent reduction beginning, an additional £1.01 million income would have potentially been generated during the 4 year period. This, as well as the 1% rent reduction, has therefore resulted in over £2.1 million overall reduction for the Council.

Over the period 2015/16 to 2019/20, the loss of rental income to the authority as a result of the 1% reduction totals £9.9 million. From 2015/16 to 2023/2024, the overall loss in rental income amounts to £27.2 million.

These figures are indicative and based on average annual rental yields. Stock levels have changed during this period through right to buy sales and new build properties coming into service such as Town View and Poppyfields.

There was no supplementary question

Question from Councillor Wetton to the Executive Mayor

As your latest newsletter (Update) fails to mention Warsop, can you tell us if you have any plans to reintroduce Leisure Facilities in Warsop?”

Thank you for your question Councillor Wetton, my update didn’t mention, Warsop, Meden Vale, Forest Town, Woodhouse, Ravensdale, Oak Tree, Berry Hill, it was an update for Mansfield residents Warsop has been part of Mansfield since 1974.

I have been asked in this chamber previously about leisure facilities in Warsop and have reassured both the Council and residents we continually support the provision of leisure and recreational facilities and services in Warsop, both in terms of the Council’s parks and open spaces and in conjunction with Mansfield District Leisure Trust.

For example, we have and will continue to support the following provisions;

The Bottoms Local Nature Reserve with;
Woodland & river walks and a picnic area

The Carrs Green Flag Park with;
A Local Nature Reserve and green space with Green Flag Award a play area, wildlife areas, fishing platforms, a community orchard and a picnic area

Carr Lane Park with;
A BMX track, a play area, a MUGA (multi-use games area) a skate park a 9 versus 9 football pitch, changing rooms/pavilion and Pergola garden

Cottage Lane open space with a large amenity area

Church Warsop with a MUGA

Pencil Park, Meden Vale with a play area, football/basketball MUGA

Princess Street with;
Small green space a play area

Warsop Vale with Rugby posts and large green space

The Council works with Mansfield District Leisure Trust to maintain health and wellbeing outreach opportunities in the community of Warsop. There have been a number of outreach community based sessions set up in partnership with community buildings in the local area. These sessions include:

yoga sessions at the Tudor Barn
Fit Together sessions at the Shed (Adam Eastwood Building) in conjunction with Vibrant Warsop, a beginner’s circuit class at the Shed.

There are also activities specifically targeting children and families within the area, such as family multisport sessions on Carr Lane Park during the school holidays.

Meden School has continued to maintain access to their school gymnasium for long standing martial arts and gymnastics clubs that operate weekly from the school and provide sporting opportunities for children.

The Council will continue to work with the Trust and other partners to provide sport and physical activity in the Warsop area using a place based approach to the planning and delivery of sporting and physical activities to improve the health and wellbeing of the residents of Warsop.

Also, as you are aware, I met with the Parish Council to discuss issues regarding the requirement of a leisure facility in Warsop and I am always happy to meet with relevant stakeholders, including the County Council, to discuss such matters.

In summary, the Council is always looking for opportunities to improve participation in sports and physical activity in both Warsop and the District as a whole, working with Active Notts and Sport England to improve engagement.

Supplementary question from Councillor Wetton

In view of the reported £90,000 operating losses in the town centre outdoor ice rink, Mayor can you justify to me and my residents in Warsop your Executive’s decision to withdraw from the management contract at Meden Sports Centre, saving this council around £80,000, that ultimately resulted in the closure of our pool, our gym and our sports hall – leaving the Warsop Parish bereft of easily accessible sports facilities?

Response from the Executive Mayor

Well I don’t know where figures are popping up from tonight because they’re way off, £90,000 losses? I don’t think so… you mentioned Warsop, you’re well aware as a County Councillor that the Meden Sports Centre is owned by the County Council, not the District Council. The only thing that Mansfield did was run it, we’d invested a lot of money in a building that was failing fast and was not fit for purpose, we’d invested on two separate occasions to try and save that building.

The County Council, under Labour control, had said verbally but not put anything in writing, that they would gift that land and clear the pool so that a new pool could be built at a reasonable cost.

When the Conservative’s took control at the County Council, the leader remade on that and said she would sell it at a commercial rate so we’ve tried to arrange meetings, as you know, to talk to the County Council to try and influence them so that we can do something with that site but as we don’t own the site, we can’t just breathe in and take it over. It’s the County Council of which you sit.

7. Question from Councillor Brown to Councillor Rickersey

The Council appoints members to serve on outside organisations, often as Trustees.

Can the Portfolio Holder outline the responsibilities that those appointed as Trustees have as Trustees, and also their responsibility to this Council as a Trustee, having been appointed by this Council?

Response from Councillor Rickersey

When appointed by the Council to act as a Trustee on a charity Elected Members should abide by the general obligations placed upon all Trustees. In summary these are to:-

• Ensure the charity is carrying out its purposes for the public benefit
• Comply with the charity’s governing document and the law
• Act in the charity’s best interests
• Manage the charity’s resources responsibly
• Act with reasonable care and skill
• Ensure the charity is accountable

These duties are separate to the duties placed upon Elected Members. When acting as a Council-appointed Trustee Elected Members have no specific responsibilities with regard to the Council but will be expected to behave in accordance with the Code of Conduct for Elected Members.

Supplementary Question from Councillor Brown

What advice would you give to anyone who is already a Trustee or considering becoming a Trustee for a charity?

Response from Councillor Rickersey

I guess my personal advice would be obviously get involved in something that you’re genuinely interested in and you’re willing to get fully involved. If you want it because it’ll look nice on your CV or you want something to talk about, I’d say don’t bother and you may be appointed by the council but you are not representing the council, you must act in the Charity’s best interest at all times. You are jointly and severably liable along with other Trustee’s. If things go wrong, you could have a problem and if vacancies occur on the body you’ve been appointed to through resignation, not attendance or if their term ends, the charity needs to notify the nominating body, in this case that would be the council, of the vacancy for the new trustee to be appointed. A charity cannot just appoint who it likes.

I think it also needs pointing out that if you’re going to become a trustee then it’s no good just be a nodding head and going along with the majority, being a Trustee carries the same responsibilities as if you are a Director of a company and as a result of your first question, I have earlier today as the Monitoring Officer to provide a formal briefing to ensure that all councillors appointed to act as Trustee’s fully understand their responsibilities.

8. Question from Councillor Ward to Councillor Answer

With almost 7000 families on the Council house waiting list, and council houses in need of repairs, will you commit to prioritise in these issues before spending money on ice rinks mayoral parades and other similar projects?

Response from Councillor Answer

The Council continues to prioritise the repair and on-going capital investment in its housing stock. This is funded through the ring-fenced Housing Revenue Account, whereas the projects highlighted (the ice rink and mayoral parade) are activities resourced by the general fund.

The Housing Revenue Account (HRA) capital schemes currently underway include:

• Fire risk assessment work in general needs housing
• Fire risk assessment work in sheltered schemes
• District heating replacements
• Door, soffit and fascia programme
• Void external door replacements
• Kitchen/bathroom upgrades for voids and where work has been refused previously
• Roof replacement programme
• Underused community centre/tenant meeting room conversions to create additional units of residential accommodation
• Development of additional affordable homes to rent and shared ownership properties

Supplementary Question from Councillor Ward

I was getting contacted a lot by residents who had concerns over the dampness issues and I’m really pleased that they’ve been resolved. The thing that I’m getting most frequently at the moment is people who are in dire situation with Housing Need, I’ve been contacted by a young mum this week who’s working and sharing a room with a two year old. She’s on band 2 but every time she applies, she finds that there is 15/20 people above her because our housing system is in such dire need and although those repairs are brilliant, I fail to see us taking advantage of getting rid of the HRH revenue cap to build more council housing, which is actually what we need so I would like to ask Councillor Answer how he’ll be addressing the housing shortage that we’ve got and whether it will take priority over supressing issues?

Response from Councillor Answer

What I can say to you is that wherever we can, we are wanting to build more houses obviously for the benefit of our residents. We are looking into raising the cap, and there are a number of issues that are on the desk at the moment with a possibility of obtaining more properties. We are building another ten properties not far from the civic here, and another 60 odd houses in Bellamy. We took a decision to spend £21.5m to build new social properties, where we can build and where we’ve got the money to build, we will build. We don’t just want to build two up two down, we want to build decent homes for decent people so they have a home to go into, not just a shell. I do support what you’re saying and we are doing all that we can to be able to assist as many people as possible to get houses.

Questions
 
19/26EXTRACT MINUTE OF THE AUDIT COMMITTEE - TREASURY MANAGEMENT STRATEGYEXTRACT MINUTE OF THE AUDIT COMMITTEE - TREASURY MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

It was proposed by the Chairman of the Audit Committee and seconded by the Audit Committee Vice Chairman that the recommendation from the Audit Committee meeting held on 25 January 2019 relating to the Council’s proposed Treasury Management Strategy be approved.
The Chamber were informed that At the meeting of the Audit Committee on 25 January 2019, the proposed Treasury Management Strategy including the annual investment strategy and Minimum Revenue Provision (MRP) strategy for 2019/2020 and the prudential and treasury indicators for 2019/2020 – 2021/2022 were presented.
It was reported that the main functions of the Treasury Management Strategy are: to ensure that the Council’s cash flow is adequately planned, to invest surplus monies in low risk counterparties and to fund capital plans.
On the motion being put to the vote it was announced that it had been carried unanimously.


Extract Minute

Report of Section 151 Officer
RESOLVED –
(i) The proposed Treasury Management Strategy 2019/2020, including prudential and treasury indicators for 2019/2020 to 2021/2022, be approved

(ii) The Annual Minimum Revenue Provision (MRP) Strategy as detailed in Appendix 7 be approved and implemented from 1 April 2019, specifically:

 Option 1 (Regulatory Method) be used to calculate the MRP on any future supported borrowing
 That the “Future Cash Flow / Impairment Method” be used for unsupported borrowing financing the acquisition of investment properties
 Option 4 (Depreciation Method) be used to calculate the MRP in the case of any future unsupported borrowing (excluding investment properties)

(iii) All future reports considered at Council which involve borrowing to support capital expenditure (excluding Housing Revenue Account (HRA) schemes) contain an assessment of additional MRP costs as this will have an impact on future revenue budgets
19/27DELEGATED DECISION BY THE PORTFOLIO HOLDER FOR TRANSFORMATION AND DIGITAL BY DESIGN - MANSFIELD HOMES LTDDELEGATED DECISION BY THE PORTFOLIO HOLDER FOR TRANSFORMATION AND DIGITAL BY DESIGN - MANSFIELD HOMES LTD

It was proposed by the Portfolio Holder for Transformation & Digital by Design and seconded by the Executive Mayor that the recommendation from the delegated decision taken on 21 February 2019 relating to Mansfield Homes Ltd be approved.

In proposing the motion, Members were informed that the Wildflower Rise development is progressing well and is within budget and programme, it was added that the show home is due to be completed in May 2019 and the whole development is due to complete in September 2019.

It was reported that in terms of promoting the scheme to potential buyers, estate agents Burchell Edwards, launched the scheme on their website on Boxing Day and held a brochure launch on 19 January in their office were 5 people attended and are interested in the development. It was added that the development has also been promoted through estate agents Rightmove and Zoopla.
Members were reminded that the contractor (Willmott Dixon Construction) is committed to achieving Social Return on Investment (SROI) and has set a target of 10% of the contract value and employs a Community Manager to deliver this, the social value target amounts to £788,555.It was reported that SROI is a measurement that helps to quantify in monetary terms the social value that is being created and there are several indicators that they measure which are themed around; More local people in employment, Improved skills for local people, Improved employability of young people and Improving staff wellbeing.

In addressing the proposal, one Member expressed concern that £8m originally earmarked to develop the Centenary Road site has now been reallocated to Mansfield homes Ltd to develop 23 luxury properties in the Carr Bank area instead. He added that local residents have stated that the abandoned Centenary Road site is now bringing down that area’s appearance and local residents would like it developing as soon as possible.

One Member expressed concern that the update report lacked depth in terms of information regarding the developer’s SROI and in particular the levels of apprenticeship hours.

One Member expressed concern that any information surrounding Mansfield Homes Ltd is not transparent enough and in some cases redacted. He added that it is very difficult for Members to influence the decision making and direction of the company.

One Member stated that Mansfield Homes Ltd is another innovative way in which the Council can secure income streams to help maintain services for local people. He added that it is anticipated that approximately £900k of profit will be generated from the Wildflower Rise development which will be returned to the Council’s General Fund.

In summing up the proposal, the Portfolio Holder for Transformation & Digital by Design informed Members that the report addresses all of the salient points to date. He added that he takes on board Members concerns regarding the update report and hopefully the issue of apprenticeship hours will be clearer in further updates.

Decision Notice

Report of Director of Economic Growth
RESOLVED - That the update on Mansfield Homes Ltd be noted.
19/28DELEGATED DECISION BY THE PORTFOLIO HOLDER FOR FINANCE - CAPITAL STRATEGY 2019/2020 - 2039/2040DELEGATED DECISION BY THE PORTFOLIO HOLDER FOR FINANCE - CAPITAL STRATEGY 2019/2020 - 2039/2040

It was proposed by the Portfolio Holder for Finance and seconded by the Executive Mayor that the recommendation from the delegated decision on 1 March 2019 relating to the Capital Strategy 2019/20-2039/40 be approved. In proposing the motion, Members were informed that the Capital Strategy is a new requirement for Council’s to produce from April 2019 following the publication of the revised Prudential Code for Capital Finance in Local Authorities 2017.It was added that the Capital Strategy is intended to give a high level overview of how capital expenditure, capital financing and treasury management activity contribute to the provision of services along with an overview of how associated risk is managed and the implications for future financial sustainability. It was reported that the Capital Strategy is a forward looking document that focuses on the core principles that underpin the Council’s long term capital expenditure and investment decisions.
In addressing the proposal, some Members expressed concern that too much investment in commercial properties is going outside the district and would prefer that more investments are undertaken within the local area. Further to this concern, another Member informed the Chamber that the Council has in fact already invested approximately £321m within Mansfield district.
One Member suggested that the Council has squandered resources on locally held events instead of investing these resources in much needed Council services for local residents.
One Member highlighted the Council’s prudential borrowing totalling approximately £65m as detailed within the report and expressed concern to the Chamber in regards to the risks involved with borrowing at this level to invest in commercial properties.
One Member stated that due to massive cuts from central government funding, the Council now has to find ways to replace this funding. It was added by the Member that investing in commercial properties in one of the innovative ways in which the Council has responded to ensure that local services are not diminished due to a short fall in income from central government.
In summing up the proposal, the Portfolio Holder for Finance informed the Chamber that the report addresses all the financial risks and future uncertainties for the Council as best it can at this point in time.
On the motion being put to the vote the Chairman announced that the motion had been carried by 17 votes in favour, with 15 votes against and 0 abstentions.


Report of Section 151 Officer

Record of Decision
RESOLVED - That the proposed Capital Strategy be approved for 2019/2020.
19/29DELEGATED DECISION BY THE PORTFOLIO HOLDER FOR SAFER COMMUNITIES - LOCAL PLAN - LOCAL DEVELOPMENT SCHEMEDELEGATED DECISION BY THE PORTFOLIO HOLDER FOR SAFER COMMUNITIES - LOCAL PLAN - LOCAL DEVELOPMENT SCHEME

It was proposed by the Portfolio Holder for Safer Communities and seconded by the Executive Mayor that the recommendation from the delegated decision taken on 1 March 2019 relating to the Local Plan – Local Development Scheme be approved. In proposing the motion, Members were informed that the Local Development Scheme (LDS) is essentially the timetable for the production of the Council’s Local Plan and Gypsy and Traveller Site Allocations DPD, it sets out the various stages of the process for the adoption of the documents and indicative dates. It was added that appendix A of the report shows the proposed LDS for the Gypsy and Traveller Site Allocations DPD and the preparation of Supplementary Planning Documents. The Chamber were informed that this is essentially a list of documents the Council will be preparing and when they are expected to be prepared.
In addressing the proposal, one Member expressed concern that the Preferred Options stage of the Local Development Scheme has on occasion been amended without proper public consultation. He added that proposed sites within the Penniment Ward area have been taken out and at a later stage been put back in .
On the motion being put to the vote it was announced that it had been carried unanimously.


Appendix 1

Report of Director of Place and Wellbeing

Decision notice
RESOLVED - That the Local Development Scheme, as outlined in Appendix A of the report be adopted by the Council and have effect from 6 March 2019.
19/30COUNCIL TAX RESOLUTION COUNCIL TAX RESOLUTION

The Portfolio Holder for Finance submitted a report seeking approval to set the Council Tax for the financial year 2019/20.It was reported by the Portfolio Holder for Finance that the recommendation is based the Council’s own rate of Tax, plus the amounts in respect of precepts received from Nottinghamshire County Council, Nottinghamshire Police and Crime Commissioner, Nottinghamshire Fire and Rescue Service and Warsop Parish Council.

It was reported that on 23 January 2019 Council approved the 2019/20 Band D Council Tax at £184.72, being a nil increase on 2018/19.It was added that the Council’s own precept for 2019/20 is detailed in Appendix A of the report and totals £5,397,500.

It was reported that for 2019/20; Warsop Parish Council precept is £104,823.84, Nottinghamshire County Council precept is £413,130.326, Nottinghamshire Police & Crime Commissioner is £6,408,801 and Nottinghamshire Fire & Rescue Authority is £2,331,748

The Portfolio Holder for Finance proposed and the Executive Mayor seconded, that the proposed Council Tax Setting Resolution as set out in Appendix A of the report be approved.

As required by the Local Authorities (Standing Orders)(England)(Amendment) Regulations 2014, a recorded vote was taken as follows:

For - Executive Mayor, Councillors Answer, Atherton, Barton, Brown, Burgin, Clay, Coxhead ,Drewett, Fisher, Garner, Harvey, Higgins, Hopewell, Lohan,McCallum, Norman, Richardson, Rickersey, Saunders, Sheppard, Sissons, Smart, Smith, Sutcliffe, Tristram, Walker, Wallace, Ward, Wetton, M Wright and L. Wright

Against - none

It was announced by the Chairman that the motion had been carried unanimously.

Report of the Portfolio Holder for Finance
RESOLVED -

1. That it be noted that on 20 December 2018 the Director of Commerce and Customer Services calculated the Council Tax Base 2019/20:

(a) For the whole Council area as 29,219.9 [Item T in the formula in Section 31B of the Local Government Finance Act 1992, as amended by the Localism Act 2011 (the “Act”)]; and

(b) For dwellings in those parts of its area to which one or more special items relate as Part of the Council’s Area. The Parish of Warsop as 3,051.1

2. Calculate that the Council Tax requirement for the Council’s own purpose for 2019/20 (excluding parish precepts) is £5, 3397,500.

3. That the following amounts be calculated by the Council for the year 2019/20 in accordance with sections 31 to 36 of the Act:

(a) £56,539,191 being the aggregate of the amounts which the Council estimates for the items set out in Section 31A(2) of the Act taking into account all precepts issued to it by Parish Councils.

(b) £51,037,099 being the aggregate of the amounts which the Council estimates for the items set out in Section 31A(3) of the Act.

(c) £5,502,092 being the amount by which the aggregate at 3(a) above exceeds the aggregate at 3(b) above, calculated by the Council in accordance with Section 31A(4) of the Act as its Council Tax requirement for the year (Item R in the formula in Section 31B of the Act).

(d) £188.30 being the amount at 3(c) above (Item R), all divided by Item T (1(a) above), calculated by the Council, in accordance with Section 31B of the Act, as the basic amount of its Council Tax for the year (including Parish precepts).

(e) £104,592 being the aggregate amount of all special items (Parish precepts) referred to in Section 34(1) of the Act.

(f) £184.72 being the amount at 3(d) above less the result given by dividing the amount at 3(e) above by Item T (1(a) above), calculated by the Council, in accordance with Section 34(2) of the Act, as the basic amount of its Council Tax for the year for dwellings in those parts of its area to which no Parish precepts relates.
Part of the Council’s Area – Warsop Parish

(g) £219.00 being the amount given by adding to the amount at 2(f) above the amount of the special item relating to dwellings in this part of the Council’s area mentioned above at 2(e) divided in each case by the amount of 1(b) above, calculated by the Council, in accordance with Section 34(3) of the Act, as the basic amount of its Council Tax for the year for those dwellings in those parts of its area to which one or more special items relate.

(h) All other parts of the Council

Being the amounts given by multiplying the amounts at 2(f) and 2(g) above by the number which, in the proportions set out in Section 5(1) of the Act, is applicable to dwellings listed in a particular valuation band divided by the number which in that proportion is applicable to dwellings listed in valuation band D, calculated by the Council in accordance with Section 36(1) of the Act, as the amounts to be taken into account for the year in respect of categories of dwellings listed in different valuation bands.

4. That it be noted for the year 2019/20 the Nottinghamshire County Council, the Nottinghamshire Police and Crime Commissioner and the Nottinghamshire Fire and Rescue Service have issued precepts to the Council in accordance with Section 40 of the Local Government Finance Act 1992 for each of the categories of dwellings in the Council’s area as shown below:-

5. That the Council, in accordance with Sections 30 and 36 of the Local Government Finance Act 1992, hereby sets the aggregate amounts as shown below as the amounts of Council Tax for the financial year 2019/20 for each part of its area and for each of the categories of dwellings:

6. That the Council’s basic amount of council tax for 2019/20 is not excessive in accordance with principles approved under Section 52ZB Local Government Finance Act 1992 and that the referendum provisions in Chapter4ZA do not apply for 2019/20. As the billing authority, the Council has not been notified by a major precepting authority that its relevant basic amount of Council Tax for 2019/20 is excessive and that the billing authority is not required to hold a referendum in accordance with Section 52ZK Local Government Finance Act 1992.
19/31REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT PANEL INTO MEMBERS' ALLOWANCESREPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT PANEL INTO MEMBERS' ALLOWANCES

The Assistant Chief Executive submitted the report and recommendations from the Independent Panel into Members' Allowances, following the Panel recent review of the existing scheme and to determine whether the current level of allowances were still appropriate.

The Executive Mayor proposed and Councillor Answer seconded that the recommendations from the Panel be adopted.

As an amendment it was proposed by Councillor Ward and seconded by Councillor McCallum that recommendation (iii) be amended to read -

That for the next four years the Basic Allowance, Special Responsibility and Co-optees’ Allowances and the Council’s flat rate within district travelling allowance be indexed to the headline figure of the national local government pay settlement (known as the NJC percentage pay settlement).

In proposing the amendment Councillor Ward stated that it was not the right time for elected members to have an increase in their allowances this year, given the reduction in incomes since 2010.

Following the debate on this amendment, it was withdrawn by Councillor Ward.

A further amendment was proposed by Councillor Ward and seconded by Councillor McCallum that -

That for the next four years the Basic Allowance, Special Responsibility and Co-optees’ Allowances remain static and the Council’s flat rate within district travelling allowance be indexed to the headline figure of the national local government pay settlement (known as the NJC percentage pay settlement), including the figure agreed for the financial year 2019-20, with effect from the beginning of the 2019-20 municipal year.

On the amendment being put to the vote the Chairman announced that it had been carried unanimously.

On the substantive motion being put to the vote the Chairman announced that it had been carried unanimously.

Report of Assistant Chief Executive Officer

Report from the Panel
RESOLVED -

(i) That the current scheme of Members’ allowances should be unaltered except for the changes recommended below.

(ii) That the Chairman of the Governance and Ethics Committee should receive a Special Responsibility Allowance of £3,000 and the two independent members a Co-optees’ Allowance of £530.51.

(iii) That for the next four years the Basic Allowance, Special Responsibility and Co-optees’ Allowances remain static and the Council’s flat rate within district travelling allowance be indexed to the headline figure of the national local government pay settlement (known as the NJC percentage pay settlement), including the figure agreed for the financial year 2019-20, with effect from the beginning of the 2019-20 municipal year.

(iv) That the subsistence and overnight rates for councillors continue to be based on the rates and conditions applicable to Mansfield District Council staff.

(v) That the child care element of the Dependants’ Carers’ Allowance be linked to the national living wage and that care for other dependants should continue to be linked to the appropriate rate paid by Nottinghamshire County Council Social Services Department for a similar type of care.

(vi) That where mileage is claimed (for journeys outside the Council area) that it should be indexed to HMRC rates.

(vii) That the changes recommended to the Members’ Allowance Scheme be implemented with effect from the beginning of the 2019-20 municipal year.
19/32PAY POLICYPAY POLICY

The Chief Executive Officer submitted the Authority's Pay Policy for 2019/20. Council was reminded that the authority was required under Section 38 of the Localism Act 2011 to publish a Pay Policy Statement by 31 March each year. Council was also reminded that the purpose of the Statement is to increase accountability in relation to payments made to senior members of local authority staff by enabling public scrutiny.

On the motion being put to the vote the Chairman announced that the motion had been carried with 29 votes in favour with one against.

Report of Chief Executive Officer

Policy Statement

Appendix 2

Appendix 2

Pay Policy

Equality Impact Assessment
RESOLVED - That the Pay Policy Statement for 2019/20 be approved.
19/33MOTIONSMOTIONS

It was proposed by Councillor Burgin and seconded by Councillor Wetton that -

The Council in principle declares a climate emergency and commits to going carbon neutral by 2040. This will help to raise the profile of the vital issue and secure external support.

To further support the work of the Council it is proposed that we join the 'Global Covenant of Mayors'. This is a free network of towns and cities around the globe who have committed to reduce carbon emissions by 40% by 2030. It also entails submitting a Sustainable Energy and Climate Action Plan (SECAP) every two years which enables towns to track progress towards meeting the zero carbon target and that the following steps be taken -

1. Declare a 'Climate Emergency'.

2. Sign up to the 'Global Covenant of Mayors'.

3. The Council to write to the Minister of State for Climate Change and Industry requesting that national policy and strategy is urgently developed to reflect the seriousness of the current emergency and to release funds to Local Authorities that will allow them to take the necessary measures at a local level.

4. Pledge to make Mansfield carbon neutral by 2040 and work with local business and industry to get them on-board with this vital issue.

5. The Council to seek to collaborate with other Local and Regional Authorities on emission reduction projects.

6. The Mayor reports back to Council in 12 months with a Sustainable Energy and Climate Change Action Plan to ensure Mansfield stays on target.

In proposing the motion, Councillor Burgin stated that radical action to reduce carbon emissions was urgently required and that such emissions were causing increases in unpredictable and dangerous weather. The Global Covenant of Mayors aims to take action to respond to the threats posed by climate change and to work as an alliance to share initiatives to tackle this threat.

Prior to the vote, the Chief Executive Officer advised Members, that whilst the motion sought support in principle, prior to the Council fully supporting the Covenant , it would be necessary for the Council to assess its current position against the Covenant and consideration would need to be given to resources to deliver it. Currently no resources had been given to this commitment or funding allocated in the current budget . It was suggested that a report be submitted on how to deliver the commitment and the required resources.

On the motion being put to the vote the Chairman announced that the motion had been carried unanimously.

It was proposed by Councillor Ward and seconded by Councillor Wetton that -

The Council supports in principle the Money Advice Trust's 'Stop the Knock' campaign and the six objectives of the campaign, which sought to improve local government debt collection.

In proposing the motion, Councillor Ward advised Council of the six objectives of the campaign which were -

Make a clear public commitment to reduce the use of bailiffs over time

Review signposting to free debt advice, including phone/online channels

Put in place a formal policy covering residents in vulnerable circumstances

Adopt the Standard Financial Statement (SFS) to objectively assess affordability

Exempt Council Tax Support (CTS) recipients from bailiff action

Sign the Council Tax Protocol and examine the Money Advice Service toolkit for working with debt advice agencies.

The Chief Executive Officer advised Council that support was currently provided to individuals with financial problems and that the Council worked in partnership with others to support such individuals. It was important that the Council did not signed up to a campaign without realising the full implications on its policies, procedures and the management of its housing stock and debt recovery. If Council had the will to support it could only do so in principle at this stage and that a review be undertaken of the Council's policies, procedures and income to inform the process.

Councillor Ward also stated that there had been an increase in the use of bailiffs by the Council and other local authorities. Councillor Ward had been involved with a number of residents who had got into debt through no fault of their own and the involvement of bailiffs had the effect of increasing the debt.

One member stated that the Council did not use bailiffs to collect rent arrears they were only used for evictions and that the Council worked with and referred tenants to money advisory services.

On the motion being put to the vote the Chairman announced that the motion had been carried unanimously.

Motions
RESOLVED -

(a) That the Council in principle declares a climate emergency and commits to going carbon neutral by 2040. This will help to raise the profile of the vital issue and secure external support.

To further support the work of the Council it is proposed that we join the 'Global Covenant of Mayors'. This is a free network of towns and cities around the globe who have committed to reduce carbon emissions by 40% by 2030. It also entails submitting a Sustainable Energy and Climate Action Plan (SECAP) every two years which enables towns to track progress towards meeting the zero carbon target and that the following steps be taken -

1. Declare a 'Climate Emergency'.

2. Sign up to the 'Global Covenant of Mayors'.

3. The Council to write to the Minister of State for Climate Change and Industry requesting that national policy and strategy is urgently developed to reflect the seriousness of the current emergency and to release funds to Local Authorities that will allow them to take the necessary measures at a local level.

4. Pledge to make Mansfield carbon neutral by 2040 and work with local business and industry to get them on-board with this vital issue.

5. The Council to seek to collaborate with other Local and Regional Authorities on emission reduction projects.

6. The Mayor reports back to Council in 12 months with a Sustainable Energy and Climate Change Action Plan to ensure Mansfield stays on target.

(b) That the Council supports in principle the Money Advice Trust's 'Stop the Knock' campaign and the six objectives of the campaign, which sought to improve local government debt collection.
Published 19/03/2019 15:36:45